Categorie archief: The Courts Academic

Analysing European Case-Law on Migration. Options for Critical Lawyers (2014)

This chapter addresses three ways in which lawyers can try to criticize the case law of European courts. The first is to re-analyse case law so as to expose its internal inconsistencies, which opens the possibility of arguing for a more consistent position. The European Court of Human Rights’ (ECtHR) case-law on judicial review in asylum cases is used as an example. The second strategy is to contrast the case-law as it stands to an alternative line of case-law which is just as valid, and thus open up the possibility of change. The European Court of Justice’s case-law on the family unity of EU citizens is used as an example. The third strategy is to bring into view an issue that has remained in the shadows as this may affect the outcome of a legal argument. The ECtHR’s case law on HIV positive aliens and Article 3 ECHRis used as an example.

Analysing European Case-Law on Migration. Options for Critical Lawyers, in Loïc Azoulai and Karin de Vries (eds): EU Migration Law: Legal Complexities and Political Rationales. The Collected Courses of the Academy of European Law, VOLUME XXI/2, Oxford University Press 2014, p. 188-218

Het debat over het Europese Hof voor de Rechten van de Mens (2012)

Het Europese Hof voor de Rechten van de Mens ligt onder vuur. Prominente Britse en Belgische rechters laten zich kritisch uit. Anderen schieten het Hof te hulp. Wat is de kern van de kritiek en de reactie daarop? En hoe moeten we het moment waarop, en de termen waarin, dit debat wordt gevoerd begrijpen?

Het debat over het Europese Hof voor de Rechten van de Mens, in Nederlands Juristenblad 2012, p. 254-262

Voor een fundamentele rechtswetenschap (2010)

Het Nederlandse onderzoek naar rechtsvinding moet een nieuwe wending nemen. In plaats van de apaiserende toon (‘De meeste zaken zijn gewoon duidelijk’) en de sussende normativiteit (‘Rechters moeten integer omgaan met de dilemma’s waarvoor hun taak hen plaatst’) komt het aan op een rigoreuzere analyse van d activiteit van de rechter.

Voor een fundamentele rechtswetenschap, in Nederlands Juristenblad 2010, p. 604 e.v.

Subsidiarity and ‘Arguability’: the European Court of Human Rights’ Case Law on Judicial Review in Asylum Cases (2009)

The European Court of Human Rights ’ case law on judicial review in asylum cases is not
entirely consistent. However, it can be interpreted as consistent if two presumptions are
accepted. First, that, as the Court’s role should be subsidiary to that of domestic courts,
domestic judicial review should at least be of the same quality and substance as the European
Court of Human Rights ’ review. Secondly, that the Court distinguishes between arguable
and non-arguable cases not just in the context of Article 13 ECHR and of the
admissibility of applications, but that this distinction is central to its entire case law about
the asylum procedure. This analysis results in a coherent doctrine on deadlines for submitting
evidence, the burden of proof, the intensity of judicial review, and suspensive effect. If
the Court understands its case law in this way, it can prevent it from becoming, in some
respects, a court of first instance.

Subsidiarity and ‘Arguability’: The European Court of Human Rights Case Law on Judicial Review in Asylum Cases, in International Journal of Refugee Law 2009, p. 48-74

Structural Instability: Strasbourg Case Law on Children’s Family Reunion (2009)

In this article, the case law of the European Court of Human Rights on children’s family reunion is examined. The argument is that the Court’s case law is necessarily inconsistent. This is so in part as a consequence of the structure of international legal argument, and partly as a consequence of the seeming normative conflict about the legitimacy of migration control. On both points, the Court is torn between two equally legitimate and equally untenable extremes, which forces the Court to take a centrist position and to acknowledge both the legitimacy and the untenable nature of any position. The main part of the article analyses how this takes shape in the legal technicalities in the judgements under review.

Structural Instability: Strasbourg Case Law on Children’s Family Reunion, in European Journal of Migration and Law 11 (2009), p. 271-293

Freedom and Constraint in Adjudication. Dutch courts on aliens law 1945-1967 (2008)

This article is a critical analysis of Dutch immigration case law in the period 1945-1967, i.e. before the introduction of modern legislation.

Freedom and Constraint in Adjudication. Dutch courts on aliens law, in Anita Böcker et al (eds): Migration Law and Sociology of Law. Collected Essays in honour of Cees Groenendijk, Wolf Legal Publishers, Nijmegen 2008, p. 345-354.